Anaesthesia and Critical Care: A Deep Insight

Critical care medicine requires a deep understanding of the complex principles of the practice with anaesthesia being an important element. Anaesthesia and critical care are two medical disciplines that are technology intensive with significant improvements being made in patient care over the last few decades. Thanks to technology and the introduction of gas analyzers, oximeters, electronic infusion pumps, and portable ultrasound, there has been a significant reduction in mortality rates attributed to anaesthesia. For the most part, anaesthesia has been specifically mentioned in the 2000 Institute of Medicine book "To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System" as an exemplary medical subspecialty.
Focusing on a perioperative environment
When it comes to anaesthesia and critical care the focus has shifted from an operating room setting to a broader perioperative environment. More than intraoperative events such as equipment failure and unanticipated difficult airway, the emphasis are more on perioperative considerations that can have an impact on an illness and its mortality. Anaesthetists have a unique understanding of the medical illnesses a patient who undergoes surgery suffers as well as the impact on specific areas of the body on which the operation is performed.
In preoperative evaluation, an anaesthetist performs a physical examination, review of lab tests, and assesses the need for testing prior to surgery. Anaesthetists have several important functions during surgery. They provide continual me dical assessment and monitor and control a patient's vital life functions. Another major responsibility is to control a patient's pain and level of consciousness in order to make conditions conducive for surgery.
PACU and critical care
In the PACU or Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit, pain control is optimized while the anaesthetist determines when a patient has recovered enough to be moved to a regular room or an intensive care unit. As an aftermath of PACU, anaesthetists are uniquely qualified to coordinate patient care in critical care units due to their extensive training in clinical pharmacology and resuscitation. In such settings, they provide extensive medical assessment and diagnosis, cardiovascular and respiratory support, and infection control. Dr. Rowan Molnar is currently the Director of Anaesthesia in an Australian Government Project in Papua New Guinea and is a past Editorial Reviewer at the Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care. As a senior specialist anaesthetist he has extensive clinical experience in anaesthesia at full service hospitals both in Australia and internationally.
This article is written by a professional author who describes the detail regarding Dr. Rowan Molnar. For more information check out:- Rowan Molnar biography.
 
by: Jarry Simon


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This article is written by a professional author who describes the detail regarding Dr. Rowan Molnar. For more information check out:- Rowan Molnar biography.

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